5 Content Publishing Models For Your Blog — Which One Are You?

Maybe you love to write. Maybe you hate it…

Or maybe you are brand new to blogging and you feel like you lack credibility.

Whatever your situation, the truth is that it’s still possible for you to build a wildly successful blog.

Let me explain…

By focusing on the right publishing model, you may feel reborn with passion to finally share your voice with the world.

This article will show you how to identify the right publishing model for you and why this is a critical part of your blog strategy.

A publishing model is the format you use to produce your blog content.

And not all formats are created equal. These different models show you that there are many ways to create content.

It can be done yourself, by others, co-created, ghostwritten, or even “borrowed” for free from others.

Whatever the path you take, there is a model for you.

So, let’s dive into the 5 publishing models…

 

The Journal

The journal model is pretty straight forward.

It is primarily a way to express yourself and/or document your journey.

You could already be successful or you could just be getting started, and the topics may be all over the board.

Self-expression and inspiration trumps blogging for business or to make money.

Example of the journal blog Unfiltered.me by Brian Gardner

I admit. I should journal more.

When I am consistent with it, I have exceptional clarity and achieve more of my goals since they are in writing.

Even when it comes to problem solving.

I just open to a blank page and write. Usually by the time my hand gets tired, the solution appears to me.

But, what is even more powerful about the journal model, is the self awareness it brings from public accountability.

Let’s say you have a goal to lose weight.

By openly sharing your goals and documenting the process, you become a source of inspiration for your readers. They are there to support you, hold you accountable, and celebrate your victories.

I truly believe when you have nothing to hide, you become more committed to the process.

“The true test of a man’s character is what he does when no one is watching.” ― John Wooden

This can be a great way to start collecting content to one day publish a book. Or, how Crossfit gyms post the workout of the day for their clients.

You probably fit the journal model if…

  • You share random thoughts and maybe you are just doing it as a hobby
  • Your motivations are purely self expression
  • You want to document experiences and thoughts in your life
  • You are not as concerned in monetizing your blog
  • You may be building your email list, but you use it just to update your readers
  • Most of all the thoughts come from you and you don’t care to have guest bloggers

Examples: Unfiltered.me, Mark Cuban, Crossfit Defined

 

The Expert

The expert model differs from the journal when money becomes the motivator.

In fact, many blogs that start out as journal blogs evolve into expert blogs when they realize they can easily monetize their efforts.

But, being an “expert” can be a controversial topic.

If you have kids or you pay any attention to pop culture, Macklemore is responsible for making it cool for your kids to shop at the thrift shop.

Macklemore recorded a song entitled “Ten Thousand Hours”, where he sings about is journey to success as an artist. One verse from the song that always hits me is where he says, “10,000 hours, I’m so damn close I can taste it”.

The song continues…

I observed Escher
I love Basquiat
I watched Keith Haring
You see I study art
The greats weren’t great because at birth they could paint
The greats were great cause they paint a lot

The whole song is based on a theory by Malcolm Gladwell from the book Outliers, where it takes 10,000 hours invested into a subject to become an “expert”.

Countless times I have held back at expressing my opinions because of a internal dialog of not knowing enough; worrisome of being judged and criticized by other “industry leaders”.

What helps me move past that every time is my intention. I’m not writing for them; I don’t care what they think and I don’t care to be a thought leader of my industry.

I’m writing this for you in hopes that this helps you and that is all that matters.

If Macklemore was paralyzed with fear of judgement from other rappers, he would not have changed the face of hip-hop with his positive music; voicing his opinions on topics of gay marriage, materialism, addiction and religion.

So, before you say “well, I am not an expert in anything”, realize that you likely already know more than your readers about a subject.

And in any scenario vulnerability will beat the “fake it until you make it” experts any day. And it brings you closer to your readers because they feel they can relate to you.

This means you don’t need 10,000 hour level mastery in order to build around the expert model.

Never become so much of an expert that you stop gaining expertise. View life as a continuous learning experience. ― Denis Waitley

You can become that “thought leader” of your niche by being the guinea pig much like Tim Ferriss does.

You probably fit the expert model if…

  • You prefer to write everything yourself
  • You are a wealth of information
  • You can talk about a topic all day long
  • You get fired up about teaching others
  • You enjoy the spotlight and telling your story
  • You want to turn what you know into a business

Examples: Kris Carr, Chris Mccombs, Tim Ferriss

 

The Host

On February 17th 2014, Jimmy Fallon ended Jay Leno’s 22 season run at the Tonight Show. Many including myself feel he knocked it out of the park with his humble opening monologue.

But, I want you to just put yourself in Jimmy’s shoes for a moment.

Imagine YOU are the one sitting behind that desk. Imagine it were YOU interviewing some of the most talented, dedicated and successful people in the world. Imagine it were YOU bringing laughter and inspiration to the world.

If you had the Tonight Show as your “platform”, what kind of connections and opportunities would open up for you?

The possibilities are endless, right?

Well, this is exactly what the host model is…

You get to leverage talented people for content by doing interviews like you would if you had your own talk show.

Sure, at first you must gain traction and credibility with your site, but once you do it will be a privilege to get on your show because who doesn’t want more exposure?

One of our Learn To Blog Insider students, Navid Moazzez, decided when starting his blog that the host model was right for him. He went from nothing to producing tons of traffic-pulling interviews with the top names of his industry in less than one year.

Example of the host model

Here’s what Navid told me about choosing the host model:

“I started doing interviews with successful entrepreneurs because I wanted to connect and become friends with the influencers in my field. It’s also a fantastic way to build your brand by association, since you’re surrounding yourself with many successful people. I’ve found it’s one of the most powerful ways to build authority when you are starting out with no experience.”

The host model is a great way for you to create a lot of content fast.

Let’s say you decide to do use the host model. You can do a video interview, post the video on YouTube, create a transcript for a blog post, and strip the audio for a podcast.

This gives you three different traffic sources for your blog; all without having to be the expert on any topic.

You probably fit the host model if…

  • You are great at interacting with people
  • You are great at listening and asking questions
  • You are genuinely interested in other people
  • You enjoy spotlight, but don’t really need it
  • You prefer to showcase others talents

Examples: Entrepreneur On Fire, Mixergy, Navid Moazzez

 

The Publisher

When you have others writing for you like a magazine, you are in a publishing model.

This is easiest achieved if one already has an audience or traffic. Since you are the “distribution channel”, the main motivation for people wanting to write for you is exposure and credibility.

The publisher model is one that is more scalable than the previous two if done correctly.

After six years of blogging, I have seen many blogs evolve. I have seen some evolve from journal to expert. Then from expert to publisher. Then even from publisher back to an expert model.

Miscues of the publisher model

In the publishing model (and every other model for that matter), quality trumps quantity. There’s so much content on the web for people to filter through, that you are much better off focusing on fewer higher quality, research driven posts.

Rather than having a cattle call for guest writers, consider cherry picking writers by reaching out to them and telling them an idea of a article you are interested in, why they are perfect for it, and what’s in it for them.

You know what your readers want…

So, when you do your research on a guest writer, it’s much easier to get a response from someone when you plant the idea in their head, rather than making them think of the idea of an article that is going to fit your audience.

Your intent is to get a response like “oh, I could totally crush that topic”.

But, not all people do the publishing model right correctly.

I’m sure at some point you’ve asked Dr. Google about a health related topic and chances are that you’ve run across an article on the Livestrong blog.

You know, the little yellow bracelets from Lance Armstrong?

I don’t support a lot of the decisions he has made, but I do love the mans courage and ability to overcome adversity.

Sadly, he went from being the face of his sport to the black eye of it when he admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs, was stripped of 7 Tour De France titles and banned from cycling for life.

The whole Livestrong brand has become another dent in his image as it has become greedy content farm.

Their goal is to publish articles that rank for every health term possible, so that they can get tons of traffic and and ad revenue.

But, if you actually read the articles you will see the are lackluster at best. There’s a reason that the articles have no comments on them.

This is a perfect example on what not to do with the publisher model.

The smart move is to post fewer articles of higher quality and spending more of your time marketing those articles.

You probably fit the publisher model if…

  • You are a networker and connector
  • You like working “behind the scenes”
  • You put experts to teach on your platform
  • You have great ideas for content that spreads
  • You’d rather promote guest writers
  • Traffic generation comes easy to you

Examples: TechCrunch, Copyblogger, Young and Raw

 

The Curator

Picture this…

You are scrolling through your Facebook newsfeed.

You are curiously stopped in your tracks by a post shared by one of your friends.

The catchy headline reads something like, “This guy was cut off in traffic and you won’t believe what he does next…”.

It’s accompanied by an irresistible image that makes it too compelling not to click on.

Greeting you on the other side is a two-minute video that provides immediate gratification to your curiosity.

You, my friend, just experienced the curation model.

Curation is finding content that is freely available around the web and repurposing that content for your site. This model has flourished with the popularity of video sites like YouTube.

For example, you find a video on YouTube, embed it on your site and write a quick review on them.

So, is it a sketchy way to get traffic or is curation a legitimate model?

Pawan Deshpande from the Huffington Post says that “curators are subject matter experts who have a knack for finding, organizing, and sharing the best and most relevant content on a given topic.”

Curation is not anything new. Deshpande says that “museums and art galleries have been doing it for centuries”.

But, the barrier to entry is just so low for anyone to start publishing content online.

With so much noise out there, it is hard to cut through it all to find what really matters. So, naturally there will be more of a demand for curators as more content is published online.

Recently, our team at Learn To Blog have been testing this model as a experiment by launching Riseable. The goal is to help small business owners cut through the fluff and find the best free content online that will help them grow their business.

Riseable

With only a few hours invested into the project, we generated 17 new email subscribers who joined the list for updates.

It’s nothing to scream about from atop the mountains, but the only cost was the purchase of a premium theme. We are growing our email list from free content and free social traffic.

We’re documenting the process of growing this site, so I encourage you to follow along so that you can learn from the experience.

You probably fit the curator model if…

  • You are good at finding great content
  • You want to quickly build a brand
  • You are okay with not “owning the content”
  • You are a great copywriter
  • Traffic generation comes easy to you

Examples: Upworthy, GodVine, Book Cover Archive

 

So, Which Publishing Model Are You?

Now, if you made it this far, I can predict exactly what you are thinking right now.

“Do I have to choose just one model?”

Absolutely not.

The goal of this article is to help you pick a path that you feel inspired by, not be limited by a box.

I suggest that if you are going to combine models, that you focus on a primary model and compliment it with a secondary model.

For example, most of your content is expert and every once in a while you sprinkle on an interview under the host model.

Like I mentioned before, many blogs also evolve over time. Maybe you want to start with a journal model and crossover to the expert and eventually to a publisher model.

It all depends on the vision for your blog. The canvas is blank and ready for you to create your masterpiece.

But, I’m very curious of your thoughts on this topic.

1. What publishing model do you fall into?

and secondly…

2. Why did you choose that direction?

Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

Choosing the Right Options and Settings for Your WordPress Blog

Do you want your blog to be indexed by search engines or you simply want to keep it as a private affair? Wanna add www to your site or rather prefer to use a non-www version? Well, the requirements and preferences of all of us vary and a self-hosted WordPress blog gives you plenty of options to fine-tune your site as per your choices. But at times, especially for a beginner, these options can be quite overwhelming and you may find yourself scratching your head trying to figure out the right setting for your blog. So, if you are wondering if you are choosing the right settings for your WordPress blog and how they impact your site, this guide will help you…

Search Engine Visibility

Ok, first things first. By default, your blog is set to be found and indexed by search engines. After all, that’s what most of the bloggers want: to be found and read by others. But in case you don’t want search engines to index your site (e.g. if yours is an invite only, paid membership, or any other type of blog with restricted access) then you should change the search engine visibility settings of your site. To do this:

  • Go to Settings > Reading
  • Check the checkbox for Discourage search engines from indexing this site
  • Save Changes

search-engine-visibility

Though this will put up a request before search engines to leave alone your site, you can’t completely rely on it; it depends upon to what extent the search engines honor your request.

www. in the Blog URL

Having www. in your site URL or steering away from it is just a matter of choice. There does not seem to be any particular reason attached to it other than your personal preference. But once you choose one over the other, make sure you stick to it. Here is how you can make these changes:

www-site-url

  • Go to Settings > General
  • Add or remove (as you want) www. from WordPress Address (URL) and Site Address (URL) boxes
  • Save Changes

Permalinks or the Blog Post URL

Permalinks give you the flexibility to decide how the URLs of your blogposts look. This applies to all of the existing and future blogposts on your site. The default URL is based on the post ID (which is auto generated) and is probably the shortest among all. There are various other options that enable you to choose your URL structure based upon date, archive, and post name. Apart from these, you can also design your own custom structure. You can choose these by just selecting the appropriate radio button (and of course, saving your preference).

If your blog is based on events, news or other time sensitive posts, then you may want to go for date or archive based structure. And if you want to keep it short yet fancy, then the post name structure would make a good choice. If the categories are important and you want to include them too, you can do that using the custom structure. Just to give you an idea, here is how to make a structure based on category and post name:

  • Go to Settings > Permalinks > Common Settings > Custom Structure
  • Enter this in the box: /%category%/%postname%
  • Save Changes

permalink-settings

As per this custom structure, if you have a post named WordPress Setting Tips under the category Blogging, then your post URL would look something like this: http://www.xyz.com/blogging/wordpress-setting-tips

Again, while actually writing the post, you can further edit the post name part in the URL to anything of your choice. So, you can even make it to look like this: http://www.xyz.com/blogging/wordpress-setting

Category Slugs

If you want to have control over what name should appear in the URL of a particular category archive, then this where you ought to make the changes. For example, if a category name is social media marketing and you want to display only social media in the category URL, then you can simply edit the slug for that category.

  • Go to Posts > Categories
  • Hover over the category name you want to edit and click on Quick Edit
  • Just edit the slug and click on Update Category

category-slug

Now, wasn’t that simple?

Enable or Disable Comments?

WordPress comes with a built-in commenting system in order to promote interaction between the author and their readers. But there are situations when a blogger may not like to use it on their blog; for instance, when they use WordPress to create a non-blogging site, or when they prefer to use some external blogging system (like Facebook comments), etc. In addition to just enabling or disabling comments, there are a whole lot of options to manage them on your site. You can see them all under: Settings > Discussion

discussion-settings

After you set the universal discussion settings for your blog, you can still enable/disable comments on individual posts and pages.

Display Name of the Author

This is the name that you wish your readers to see as the author of the posts on your blog. You can choose to have it same as or different from your real name, user name or nickname:

  • Go to Users > Your Profile
  • Select the appropriate option from the drop down menu in the Display name publicly as box
  • Click on Update Profile at the bottom of the page

author-display-name

If you are not getting the desired name in the dropdown menu, check whether you have left blank any of the fields under the Name section.

Media Settings

Media settings may not be that important most of the times but they can really make your life easy if you run an image based blog, or your blog requires images of a standard size. You can set thumbnail, medium and large sizes for your images here: Settings > Media

If you need thumbnail images of exactly the same dimensions that you specify, then you should check the box for this, in the Thumbnail size section.

media-settings

Apart from the image sizes, you can also choose/change the folder to store the images. Also, your media uploads would be automatically organized into month and year based folders by default. I personally prefer to disable this feature by unchecking the relevant box, so that all my images are uploaded in a single folder. This provides for easy replacement of linked images whenever required.

Menu Structure

With the introduction of Menu in WordPress, it has become very convenient to include and exclude items from your navigation. It has also facilitated building of drop down menus. Now you can include pages, categories and individual links, and that means almost anything. You can also choose to automatically add new pages in the menu as and when you publish them; all you need to do is check the box for Auto add pages.

For creating a drop down menu:

  • place the items of the dropdown menu right under the main item you want them under
  • one by one, drag the drop down menu items towards little right, so that they are created as submenu of the main item
  • Click on Save Menu

menu-structure

But before you can start using the menu feature, you need to create a new menu, give it a name and assign it a theme location. Be it while creating a new menu or making any changes in an existing menu, don’t forget to save the Menu, else your changes will not take effect.

Theme Settings

Apart from the WordPress settings, you also need to set your theme settings right. What and how many options you get actually depends upon the theme you use. But almost all modern themes allow you to upload a header image, change the background color or upload a background image, edit your footer, choose which side you want to have the sidebar, etc.

Here is what the theme settings for the twenty fourteen default theme would look like:

twenty-fourteen-theme-settings

Right File Permissions for Security

This one is not typically a WordPress setting but given the importance it holds, it makes up to the list.  From the point of security, it is imperative that you check the file permission settings of some important files, especially wp-config.php and .htaccess files. But remember you won’t find them in your WordPress login; they would be there inside your web hosting control panel.

htaccess-file-permission

  • Login to your web hosting control panel
  • Click on the File Manager
  • Go to the public_html directory (or further down to your blog folder if it is not installed in the root domain).
  • Look out for the wp-config.php and .htaccess files.
  • To check the file permissions you’ve currently given them, right click on the file and click on Change Permissions in the pop-up menu that appears.
  • These two files should have read only permission under all the 3 modes: user, group and world. If there are more permissions assigned (Write or Execute), reduce them to read only, so that the digits in the Permission boxes read 444
  • Click on Change Permissions to save the changes.

So, these are some of the core settings of your WordPress site and choosing them right is just a one-time process. You need not, or rather should not, keep them changing every now and then; since that’ll have a negative impact on your site. Apart from these, you should also ensure that the settings of any plugin that you install are optimized for your site.

Beginner’s Guide to Setting up a Self-hosted WordPress Blog

Over the last decade or so, blogging has emerged as a promising career option and many bloggers have adopted it as a full time profession making a decent living out of it. Business entities big and small alike are integrating blogs into their website for better engagement and conversion. From blogging for hobby on a free platform like Blogspot to setting up a full-fledged self-hosted blogging site on CMS like WordPress, blogging for sure has come a long way.

So, what does it take to set up a professional looking blog that you can call your own in the real sense and take with you from one webhost to another, whenever you feel like? Well, the answer is – nothing much. All you need is a domain name for your website and a hosting service to keep it live 24×7. The installation process is no rocket science either. If you are comfortable running a PC, you are good enough to set up your own blog.

In the tutorial below, we walk you step by step through the process of setting up a self-hosted WordPress blog.

Step 1: Register a domain name

Before you begin setting up a blog, you need to decide upon an address with which people can access it from their web browser. It is called domain name and it forms a major part of your blog URL. For example, in the URL http://learntoblog.com, learntoblog.com is the domain name.

You can buy a domain name from a domain name registrar for a particular period of time (usually a year and in multiples thereof) and then continue to renew it so long you intend to keep it with you. There are a lot of domain registrars you can register a domain name with; here is how you can do it with Godaddy, one of the popular domain registrars:

domain-search

  • Visit their website: godaddy.com
  • Using the search box on the homepage, check out the availability of the domain name you want. You can check for different extensions but .com, .net and .org are among the most popular domain extensions, in that order.
  • Once the domain name you want to go with is available, add it to the shopping cart and click on Continue
  • They will try to cross-sell various other products/services along with the domain name, but you can ignore all of them and Continue to Cart
  • This will take you to the order review page. Once you are sure of the order summary, you can Proceed to Checkout
  • If you have not registered with them earlier, click on New Customer and fill in all the details. You will also have to select a payment method and enter the necessary details. Once ready click on Continue.
  • Once the payment is processed successfully, the domain will be in your account. You can login to your Godaddy account using your username and password, and manage your domain.

Step 2: Buy a web hosting account

Next you will require a web server where you can install the blogging software and upload your blog files. But you don’t have to buy yourself a physical server for this. There are a number of webhosts that offer this service. So, all you have to do is buy a web hosting service from some reliable provider like HostGator:

  • Click on View Web Hosting Plans

view-webhosting-plans

  • Select the plan you want to go with and click on Order Now. For beginners intending to set up only 1 blog, Hatchling Plan should be sufficient. If however, you want to set up multiple blogs, then you should go with the Baby Plan.
  • In the order form that comes next, select the radio button I already own this domain (since you will have already bought a domain name in Step 1). Now enter your domain name in the box just below that. Remember, it’s just the domain name (without http:// or www).

already-own-domain

  • Fill up the rest of the form with your desired Username, Security Pin (password), Billing Information, Payment Information and other details.
  • See the Hosting Addons section in the form carefully. If some items are checked and you don’t need them, just uncheck them.
  • Below the Hosting Addons section, you will see a box to enter a Coupon Code. Enter the code: LearnToBlog1 to get a discount of 25%. If there is already some default code in the box, you can replace that with this code and you’ll see your total due amount come down substantially.

hostgator-coupon-code

  • Check the terms and conditions acknowledgement check box and click on CREATE ACCOUNT.
  • Now the system will start processing your payment and on successful processing, you will receive your hosting account details at the email address that you mentioned in the order form. Don’t forget to check your junk or spam folder if you don’t see it in your inbox.

Step 3: Point the domain to your nameservers

Now that you have a domain name and a hosting account, the next step is to link these two. This too is fairly easy:

  • Check the account information mail that you received from your webhost (HostGator). Note down the nameservers. There will be 2 nameservers and you’ll need both of them. It will look something like this: ns3167.hostgator.com and ns3168.hostgator.com
  • Now login to your domain account (Godaddy)
  • Hover on: Products > Domains and click on Manage Now. You will see a list of all the domains in your account.

manage-domain

  • Click on the domain name you want to set up your blog on.
  • You will see the default nameservers under the settings tab which would be something like: NS67.DOMAINCONTROL.COM and NS68.DOMAINCONTROL.COM. Just below that, you will see a link to Manage your nameservers. Click on it and a small Nameserver Settings window will pop up.

manage-dns

  • Select the Custom radio button and click on Enter custom nameservers. Enter both the nameservers that you got from your hosting provider, one each in a box. Click on OK and Save the settings.

add-nameservers

This will link your domain name with your hosting account. But remember, the settings will not come into effect immediately since they will have to spread all over the World Wide Web. This process of domain name server (DNS) propagation usually happens in a few hours but can take as long as 72 hours to complete.

Step 4. Install WordPress

Ok, now the real action begins. We will start installing WordPress, the most popular blogging software, on our server. Here we go:

4.1 Uploading and extracting of files:

  • Go to wordpress.org
  • Download WordPress. You will get the option of downloading it as .zip or .tar.gz compressed file; the choice is yours.
  • Now login to your webhosting control panel (cPanel) using the username and password you got from your web hosting provider. Your cPanel login URL would be: http://domainname.com/cpanel where you need to replace domainname with your actual domain name. But if your DNS has not yet resolved (not propagated on the web), this URL will not work. In such case, use the temporary cPanel URL that your webhost has provided.
  • Click on File Manager under the ‘Files’ section. In the ‘File Manager Directory Selection’ popup that appears, select the radio button for Web Root (public_html/www) and click on Go. This will take you to your root directory public_html.

file-manager

  • Now upload the WordPress compressed file to your root directory. For this, click on the Upload button from the menu at the top, and choose the file to be uploaded. You can see the upload progress in the bottom right corner. Once the upload is complete, you can come back to your root directory by clicking on the link that appears in the center of the upload page. If however you want to install your blog in a subdirectory instead of the root directory, then you should create a new folder first and upload the WordPress file in that folder. The name of that folder will become a part of your blog URL. For example, if it is named ‘blog’, then your blog URL would be similar to: http://domainname.com/blog

upload-button

upload-files

  • Since we have uploaded a compressed file, the next step would be to extract it. For this, select the compressed file and click on Extract from the top menu. Select the path as the root directory (/public_html) or the subdirectory (/public_html/blog, etc.) depending upon where you want to install the blog, and then click on Extract File(s).
  • Now if you observe properly, you will see that a new folder called ‘wordpress’ is created and all the extracted files are placed inside that folder. We need to bring the content of this folder directly under the root directly or the subdirectory where we want to install the blog. So, go to this ‘wordpress’ folder and select all the content of this folder using shift key and mouse. Files being selected, click on the Move File icon in the top menu. Select the correct destination path in the pop-up and click on the Move File(s) button. This should make the ‘wordpress’ folder empty which may now be deleted.

4.2 Creating a database and user:

WordPress installation runs on a MySQL database. So, let’s get creating one:

  • Close the File Manager (to avoid any likely confusion) and come back to the cPanel homepage.
  • Under the Databases category, click on MySQL Database Wizard.

mysql-database-wizard

  • You will see that your cPanel username is prefixed to your database name by default. Complete your database name by adding up preferably 6-7 characters in the box provided, and head on to Next Step, which is to create a database user.

database-name

  • Just like the database name, fill up the box for username as well in order to create a database user. For ease of identification, you can keep it same as your database name. But remember, you can enter only upto 7 characters.

database-user

  • Use the Password Generator to generate a strong and safe password. Make note of the password; we will need it soon. Now, check the checkbox to acknowledge that you have copied the password and then click on Use Password.
  • Everything filled in, click on Create User.
  • Next is the step for adding the user to the database. But before this, note down the complete name of the database as well as the user. Now check the checkbox for ALL PRIVILEGES and hit on Next Step.

db-user-privileges

With this, we have created a database, a database user, and added the user to the database too.

4.3 Editing the wp-config.php file:

For the database to become functional, we’ll have to link it to WordPress. Here is how we do this:

  • Once again, go to the File Manager and look out for a file named wp-config-sample.php. Rename it to wp-config.php (double clicking on the file name will change it to edit-mode).
  • Now start editing the renamed wp-config.php file. You can do this by selecting the file and clicking on the Edit icon in the top menu.
  • Enter your database name, database username and database password.

editing-wp-config-file

  • Save Changes and close the file.

4.4 Running the installation script:

Almost there! Just one more step to go:

  • Open your blog URL in a web browser. It would be similar to: http://domainname.com or http://domainname.com/blog depending upon where you installed WordPress.

wp-install-script

  • Fill up the installation form with your desired details like site title, username, password, email ID, etc. Don’t forget to check the checkbox saying Allow search engines to index this site unless and until you want your blog to be a secret affair hidden from Google and other search engines. As a final step, click on Install WordPress. That’s it. Your blog is ready to rock!

4.5 Installation using auto-install script, Fantastico:

If you don’t want to go through the manual installation process of uploading files, creating database, editing wp-config.php file and all, there is an easier alternative available. The auto-install script called Fantastico can do it for you:

  • Go to your cPanel homepage and click on Fantastico De Luxe under the Software/Services category.
  • Click on WordPress from navigation menu on the left side and then on New Installation.

fantastico-auto-install

  • Fill in the details and hit the Install WordPress button.

That’s all you got to do. Everything else will be taken care of by the auto-install script.

4.6 Logging in to your WordPress site:

You can login to your WordPress site using the login URL which would be like: http://domainname.com/wp-admin

wordpress-login-screen

It will ask for your username and password. These would be the ones that you used while running the WordPress installation script or the ones you filled up in Fantastico, as the case may be. Note that your domain login credentials, cPanel login credentials and MySQL database credentials have NOTHING TO DO HERE.

4.7 Adding www. in the URL:

By default, your blog URL would be like: http://domainname.com

What if you want to add www. to it in order to make it look like: http://www.domainname.com

No worries, this part is easy too:

change-wordpress-url

  • Login to your WordPress site
  • Go to Settings > General
  • Add www. in the WordPress Address (URL) as well as in the Site Address (URL). Click on Save Changes and you are done. As you save this, you will be automatically logged out of your site. Don’t worry, it just happens because your URL is changed. You can login again using the new URL with www.

Step 5. Install a suitable theme

Design and looks of your blog depends upon the template that you use. A WordPress template is popularly known as a theme. The WordPress blog you install comes with a default theme. You can change this theme anytime you want to change the looks of your site; and you can do this without affecting the content of your site.

5.1 Installing a free theme from WordPress repository:

WordPress has a huge collection of free themes to choose from. You can see them all here: wordpress.org/themes

You can access and install any of these themes directly from your admin panel:

install-theme

  • Login to your site
  • Go to Appearance > Themes and click on Add New.
  • You will be taken to an interface where you can search for a theme either using a keyword or a specific set of features. You can also get the list of Featured, Newest and Recently Updated themes.
  • Click on the theme that you like. This will give you preview of the theme as well as an option to install it. Click on the Install button if you like the preview and want to proceed with installation. Now the theme is added to your blog’s collection but remember – it is not live yet.
  • To make your theme live, click on Activate. Or before doing that if you want to see how it looks on your site, click on Live Preview.

While browsing through WordPress themes repository, if you happen to like a theme, you can download and install it by following the below method as well.

5.2 Installing a theme from outside WordPress repository:

Sometimes, you may want to go with a premium theme. Or it may be just that you found a great theme from somewhere outside the WordPress repository and want to install it. Well, even that’s possible; just see to it that the theme is a WordPress theme and follow the below process:

upload-theme

  • Download the theme that you want to install. This should be a compressed, .zip file.
  • Login to your site
  • Go to Appearance > Themes and click on Add New.
  • Click on Upload
  • Choose the file (theme in .zip format) and click on Install Now.
  • Click on Activate and there you are!

All the themes that you upload or install will be available in Appearance > Themes. You can activate any of them any time you like.

Step 6. Start writing your blog post

Now that you have installed your blog, you are ready to begin writing your first blog post; or should I say, you’ve already done that! Yes, your default ‘Hello world’ post goes live as soon as you install a blog. You can choose to edit it, ignore it or delete it.

add-new-post

  • Login to your site and click on Posts in the left panel. This will take you to the list of existing posts.
  • Hover over the default post and you will see the options to edit or trash it.
  • If you want to add a new post, click on Add New button either at the top or in the left panel under ‘Posts’
  • Add the post title at the top and write the post in the main body.
  • Should you need to add any image, click on Add Media, upload the image file and then click on Insert into post. When you upload an image, you also get to choose its alignment, link it to a URL and optimize it by means of Alt Text, Description, etc.
  • You will also need to select a category for your post. Since the only category by default would be uncategorized, you may want to add a new category. You can easily do this by clicking on + Add New Category.
  • You can also add some tags to the post if you feel like.
  • If you want to see how it would look when the post goes live, you’ve got a preview button for that.
  • Once everything ready, hit the Publish button and your post is live. If you want to leave the post half way for now and continue with it later, you can save it as draft.
  • For scheduling a post to a future date, click on the small Edit button just beside ‘Publish immediately’. Enter the date and time you want to schedule for and click on OK. This will change the Publish button to Schedule button. Now click on that as a final step.

Once you set up your blog and continue to write more blog posts, you will keep learning more things. Writing static pages, inserting videos, adding plugins, creating users for co-blogging… there are loads of other features and options to explore. We will be covering them separately on our blog, stay tuned!

7 Ways To Blog With Google In Mind

Google SEO? Seriously?

At this moment you might be literally pulling your hair out – wondering how, after getting so much of your life sucked into your blog, you will have time to learn about writing for Google too?

Your blog is not just about what you write about.

For your blog to be successful it also has to be about people seeing what you write.

Nobody knows your blog exists until they encounter it – and for most the middle man between you and your potential readers is Google.

As Rand Fishkin of Moz mentioned, “According to the Statcounter data (the only source I really trust)…Google has maintained 80% of search in the US, and 90% plus around the world.”

Yes, Bing is a good search interface. Yes, people go other places. 80% (Did I mention 80% of search….80%!!!!).

Luckily, I have seven simple tips to help you make friends with Google!

How can you start making friends with Google?

1.  Use Title Tags

You only have a few organic ways to get click-through to your blog: 1) Showing up in search and 2) Having the most magnetic Title and ‘Snippet’ on the page when people see you in search

When you do a search in Google – each organic result that turns up has three parts: a Title; a URL, and a Snippet.  I call this area “Snippet Space.”

You have heard the saying, “You only have one chance to make a good first impression?”  Snippet space is that one chance in search. And the title tag is the most important part of Snippet Space.

Your HTML title tag is what forms the “Title” part of snippet space when your site shows up in Organic Searches.  If the keywords a person is searching for are in your HTML title tag – those words will be bolded in the results (obviously a benefit to standing out in relevance to the searcher).

Automation Google Bots

When Googlebots crawl your website/blog and try to determine how important your site will be to potential searchers the Title Tag is one of the ways they determine if your content will satisfy searchers.  It is important to write the way Googlebots read.

Title Tags are also one of the ways you can use Snippet Space to attract people to your page.

Imagine that every time your site shows up in search the snippet space is free advertising space – but it is only as valuable as it is magnetic.

How many times have you done a search and immediately passed over whole pages of results that did not immediately catch your eye?

How many times have you simply ignored an advertisement on television or the radio because it did not command your attention?

Snippet space is Showtime for your blog.  If you do not get attention here – you will not grow your readership through search.

Don’t just take my word for it, Part one of Google’s “Search Optimization Starter Guide” is titled: “Create unique, accurate page tiles.”

Some Title Tag Best Practices

  • You can write your title tags using your blog platforms SEO tool
  • Experiment with writing these tags just like you practice writing headlines for your blog posts. – Don’t publish a post without optimizing it
  • Title tags ought be a maximum of 70 characters, including spaces
  • When you write your title tags, separate the things you write using the pipe symbol “|” (it’s located right above the enter key).  For instance, if I were writing a title tag for this post, and I wanted to include the blogs name it would read:  7 Ways to Blog with Google in Mind | Learntoblog,com
  • Try to put the most important keywords early in the title and if you are working on local SEO also include where you are located.
  • Create unique tags for every page that accurately describe the content of that page
  • Try to avoid ‘stop words’ – words that have no possible keyword value

2.  Use Meta Descriptions

Your Meta Description most often is what forms the Snippet – the description of the webpage below the URL.  Think of it as another opportunity to hook the searcher.  If you caught their eye with your title tag – you can move them down the funnel with the description.

The important thing here is not to ignore the opportunity to control your snippet space.  Always fill these tags out for every post/page on your site.

Some Meta Description Best Practices:

  • You can write your Meta Description using your blog platforms SEO tool
  • Experiment with writing these tags just like you practice writing headlines for your blog posts. – Don’t publish a post without optimizing it
  • Google will display up to 150 characters of your description
  • Try to include structured data that might get attention and would not be in the results otherwise
  •  Write your descriptions as calls to action
  • Try to answer the questions you think represent the reasons people are searching for you

3. Alt Images Tags

Googlebots are pretty smart (for algorithms), but they cannot always see pictures or interpret what they represent.  In order for you to get credit for the value of your images to your content, you need to label them (explaining succinctly what they include).  This is fairly important because images matter in how Google values your content.

Some Alt Images Best Practices:

  • You can write your Alt Image Tags  using your blog platforms SEO tool
  • Experiment with writing these tags just like you practice writing headlines for your blog posts. – Don’t publish a post without optimizing it

4.  Anchor Text

Anchor text is the colored and underlined clickable text that can be clicked on to take the reader to another site.  Anchor text is one of the ways Googlebots try to match your site to the importance of its content.

Anchor text wears many hats in online publishing.

It is the main way you give credit to the people you are quoting or referencing in your writing and it is a means of generating links between your blog and other sites (which is important to establishing the authority of your blog)

You can make your anchor text be an exact match of the site you are quoting from, you can tie the anchor text to keywords or long-tail keyword phrases you are targeting, or you can have the anchor text say “click here” or something similar.

As Google moves from keyword driven search to semantic search (where it uses all available information to determine exactly what people are searching for by using contextual devices like search history, geo-location, or what fits your personal history best) – for blog writing, it makes the most sense to choose your anchor text where it makes the best sense naturally in your writing.

In addition, there is a great deal of debate among SEO experts right now over if anchor text will begin to be less valued by Google’s algorithm.  However, this change certainly hasn’t entirely devalued anchor text – and making sure your anchor text and your content is connected to ideas that show the value of your content to a searcher is what likely matters to Google.

In other words, Google wants everything to be written and marked up in the most conversational style possible.

In the old days of SEO you could game the search engine by simply loading up content with irrelevant anchor text and links, now Google is committed to making search serve the searcher and not the site.

The most important thing to remember about anchor text is to use it whenever it is appropriate.

I like to use anchor text to allow the reader to get more context and deeper information about anything I am writing about.

You should be able to apply anchor text using your blog platforms SEO-tool.

5.  Sign up for Google+

Google Plus

In 2013 Google changed drastically, deciding to connect all of their projects and platforms through their Google+ social network.  In other words, the universe of Google is now connected through the Google+ network.

A few months ago, a friend asked me to give him just a few easy to ideas for getting his business website higher in search results.  The first question I asked him was:  Are you a Google+ member?

Long story short, just by having him sign up for Google+ and having him tie his site to Google+ his site jumped from page three to page one for his local targets..  There is debate over how important Google+ is but there is pretty solid evidence connecting Google+ and optimization.

Worst case scenario, it’s a pretty small price to pay for a potential SEO benefit.  Best case scenario, it is another route for people to use to find your content and one that gives your blog an SEO boost.

Google+ Best Practices

  • Make sure you fill out all your information in sync with how it is filled out on your website – Inconsistent listings cause ‘Googlebot confusion’ and can actually hurt your SEO.
  • Fill out your profile completely
  • Link your website to your Google+ profile (the option for this is in settings)
  • Add Google+ badges on your blog and +1 clickable icons so that people can click to add you
  •  Input your blog URL in the intro section, provide a call to action giving people a reason to check your blog out, add your blog again in the links section
  •  Search and join circles that would appreciate the content you provide through your blog.  Participate when possible so that people see you as an active community member
  • Write teaser versions of your blog content and publish them with links to your blog through Google+

6.  Sign up for Google Authorship

One of the biggest new concepts Google deepened in 2013 was Authorship.  Google wants to be able to ensure that the content the search engine points to is written by real people.

The first step to getting seen by Google as a credible real-person is signing up for Google Authorship. Obviously, there are some SEO benefits to being seen as an author by Google.  One of the biggest benefits occurs in “Snippet Space” – Google authors often appear in search results with an addition to the snippet – a Rich Snippet which includes the head shot from your Google+ profile – and a count of how many Google+ circles you belong to.

How Google says to sign up for authorship:

  • Put a profile photo on your Google+ account
  • Make sure a byline with your name appears on every page of your content and that that byline name matches your Google+ name
  • Have an email address from the same domain as your content.  If you publish in places that are different than your domain (guest blogging) make sure there is a link to your Google+ profile in your author bio space in that content.
  • If you do blog for other sites, there is a place on your Google+ profile where you can enter up to 10 sites you publish for and want to get authorship credit for (in the ‘contributor to’ section of your profile)
  • If you have a business that publishes through your blog also sign up for the rel=publisher attribute

7.  Sign up for Google+ Local

iphone google plus

There are some confusing things about the recent changes to Google’s architecture for local search.  In particular, Google recently moved everyone from “Google Places” to “Google+ Local Pages” and “Google+ Business Pages.”

It is, however, important to keep up with these changes to Google’s architecture and maintain a presence in local search – especially if there is a relationship between your blogs relevance and the area you live in.

In addition, with people spending more and more time on mobile devices, Google+ local becomes increasingly important even if you do not have local intent (Local has a ton to do with how Google is adapting to mobile).

You should also have a Google+ business page.  There are real benefits from integrating fully into Google+ – everything from SEO to how you turn up in search.

However, you should be really careful to not make Google+ a substitute for your blog.  It is important to remember that all of your peripherals (social media sites etc.) are ways to get people to your blog not a substitute for your blog.  It is called “inbound marketing” for a reason – the goal is to own media and bring people to your own space.

Google’s instructions for signing up for Google+ Local Pages are here

Google’s instructions for signing up for a Google+ Business Pages are here

Bringing it all together

Google Plus

It can be frustrating keeping up with a blog. It is hard enough to find the time to keep enough content on your blog to make it relevant much less learn all the tricks necessary to bring people to your blog.

As hard as it is, you have to remember that there is more to blogging than writing.  Unless you are writing only as a creative outlet, your main goal should be to get eyes to your posts.

At least 80% of the time Google is the middle-person (middle-algorithm?) between searchers and your blog content – It is critical to your success that you write with Google (and Googlebots) in mind.

Hopefully, these tips will help you please Google!

What did I leave out?  Please take a second and share your own best tips for keeping your blog prominent on Google!

 

5 Things to Include In Every Blog Post

Blogging is a great way to get to know your audience.  It puts you directly into contact with them.  It provides you with an opportunity to explain, in detail, the products and services your business offers.  It gives you the chance to give a voice to your blog, answer questions, and address some of the concerns your customers might face in their day-to-day lives.

You know what makes Seth Godin’s blog readable?  His posts are short and sweet yet they cause you to question yourself and the world around you.  If in four paragraphs, the best-selling author can make you think, why do you need 1,000 words to get your message across?

Blog writing is not black or white.  There is a lot of grey area to address and this largely depends on the audience you’re catering to.  You can’t write for twenty-something computer programmers and expect forty-year-old housewives with college-aged children to respond the same way.  Know your audience before writing a single post.  It will help you move forward in the right direction.

Good Content Adds Value to Your Blog and Website

With that being said, there’s a distinct difference between good content and bad content.  Good content adds value to an experience.  Bad content aims to please no one.  It simply exists as a way of tricking the search engines into thinking it’s something worth reading.  For a long time, bad content slipped through the cracks and jammed up the Internet superhighway before it was discovered.

Cracking down on blog writer violators wasn’t as easy as first thought.  After all, there are scores of people who know about Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and try as they might to punish the repeat offenders, Google was very unsuccessful.  A number of changes are in place to prevent bad content from flooding the web yet again.  One of the most obvious is Google’s removal of its free keyword tool.  If you want to access it, you need an Adwords account.

Know Your Audience

When writing blog posts for your company website, there are a number of different things to consider.  First and foremost, what is the point behind your blog?  Is it to gain new customers or to show the customers that you have new ways of using your products and services?  Is it to educate, entertain, gain support or a little of each?

Who is your audience?  What type of people purchase your products or services?  How do they get their information?  From your blog, through your social media accounts or do they take something away with them each time they visit both?

Anatomy of a Killer Post – 5 Things to Include In Every Blog Post

Have you ever wondered why some bloggers have such a big following?  It’s because they follow a simple formula for creating killer content.  That, and they’re consistent.  They update the blog regularly and they constantly engage their audience through meaningful social media posts.

These 5 things should be included in every blog post:

  1. An attention-grabbing title.  Think of the title of each blog entry as your “book jacket”.  People will determine whether or not your blog is worth reading in a matter of seconds.  If the title is blasé, your bounce rate is going to be high and your retention rate is going to be low.  It’s hard to win over a reader after they’ve decided that your blog is useless to them.
  2. A high quality, relevant photo.  You don’t have to post a picture under every paragraph but you should at minimum have a least one to two photos per blog post.  If you take them yourself, you get bonus points.  If you don’t possess any camera skills, you can always purchase images from a stock photography website like Shutterstock or Dreamstime.
  3. A hook that captivates the audience.  So much content is recycled that you have to approach subjects in a fresh and exciting way.  How will you grab the interest of your readers?  Will you share a personal story with them?  Will you speak out on a controversial subject?  What makes you different is what makes you interesting.  Don’t write for the sake of writing.  Write as a way to express yourself and the ideologies that you and your company believe in.  Write to stay on top of current events.  Write to address customer questions and concerns.
  4. Headers, subheaders, and bulleted or numbered lists.  Scrolling through paragraph after paragraph of blocky text is annoying.  No one in their right mind will spend time reading your blogs if they don’t have some type of formatting.  Headers, subheaders, and lists give readers a break from the monotony of text.  It also allows them to quickly scan the blog for the information that they need quickly and effectively.  Everyone loves a list so include one whenever possible.
  5. Links to authoritative websites.  If you refer to another website in your post, make sure to link to it.  You can set it up so that your reader never leaves your page.  Instead, the link opens in another window.  Find out who pulls weight in the industry you’re writing for.  Link to their website.  They may reward you by doing the same on their website.  If you’re known for great content, no matter how old your blog is, you’ll start to see people visiting from other sites.  Take advantage of this as much as possible.  It’s like guest blogging without needing to write a word.

Your blog doesn’t need to be updated several times daily to be effective.  Think about it.  Quality trumps quantity every day of the week.  Write shareworthy posts and you’ll get the traffic you need to your website.  People will want to know what you have to say.  They’ll look forward to reading your blog.

Follow the simple formula listed above to write blog posts that promote your business.  You’ll be astounded at how quickly you’ll build a following.  Whatever the objective is for your blog, you’ll achieve it successfully in very little time by following the advice listed above.

Why and How to Make Your WordPress Blog Mobile Friendly

There was a time when mobile phones were devices used for the sole purpose of making phone calls; that was all it was capable of. But that was then. Fast forward to today, every big website has a mobile version. If your website lacks a mobile friendly design, you are losing the ever growing community of mobile web users. It is estimated that the number of mobile internet users will overtake that of desktop users some time very soon. So, it’s high time you took care of your mobile visitors by providing a mobile friendly interface of your website for them. Ignoring mobile users is the worst thing you can do now as this is no more a matter of choice. The internet today is mobile friendly. Which is why it is essential to learn how to make your WordPress blog mobile friendly.

Why go mobile?

Almost everyone has a smartphone these days and more than for calling, they use it to access internet. If you don’t optimize your site for mobile devices, it will look cluttered and unreadable on a mobile phone’s screen which is much smaller than a desktop or a laptop. Having a mobile friendly design makes your site legible and clean to a mobile visitor. Another benefit is that people appreciate the fact that you cared enough to create a mobile optimized site for them and that adds to your authenticity. If your site is not mobile friendly, visitors that land on your site from mobile devices are more than likely to leave it right away seeing the cluttered interface. Having a mobile version simply makes those otherwise leaving visitors stick around just like the visitors from larger screens.

Even if some of your mobile visitors manage to read the content on your not-so-mobile-friendly site, they are more likely to miss your call to action. Every good website has a call to action, be it subscribe to the email newsletter, complete a form, buy a product or anything for that matter. By having a design that is optimized for mobile devices, you can ensure that your call to action gets seen by the mobile visitors too.

Having a mobile friendly version of your site has some SEO benefits too. The fact is Google wants every site to have a mobile friendly design in order to help Google serve it to searches made from smartphones. Google has already made mobile search a top priority as the number of searches made from smartphones is on the rise.

Different ways to make your blog design mobile friendly

There are several ways to make your website design suitable for viewing on mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. However, we’ll look into the 3 most commonly followed methods here.

1. Use a responsive theme

responsive-themeUsing a responsive wordpress theme is the easiest way to optimize your site for mobile visitors. A responsive theme adjusts itself according to the device being used by the incoming visitor. So a visitor from desktop or laptop will see a wide interface whereas mobile visitor will get the interface that fits on his screen without any cluttering. Most of the times, all you need to make your site mobile friendly is just a responsive theme and it is the most popular method for making your site mobile friendly.But it has its drawbacks too, the responsive themes do not reduce the size of images being used and you would have to do this manually for your site to load faster on slow connections of mobile devices. However, having a mobile friendly layout itself is half the work done.

2. Use a plugin

We use wordpress plugins to solve most of our site related issues and there are plugins that can make your blog mobile friendly too. The perk of using a plugin is that you can install and start using it within a matter of minutes. It does not require you to have any knowledge on optimizing sites for mobile. Here are some popular plugins you can use for this:

WPtouch: WPtouch mobile plugin instantly makes your site a mobile optimized, touch friendly website that can be viewed perfectly on all mobile devices. It detects the device of your incoming visitor and provides them the suitable version of your site. You have more options to customize the design according to your taste. The premium version of WPtouch mobile offers even more exciting features like automatic video and photo scaling, support for retina and HD displays, etc.

WP Mobile Detector: WP Mobile Detector plugin can identify if the visitor is using an ordinary mobile phone or a smartphone and it displays a suitable version of your site layout differently for each of them. It can detect and support over 5000 different mobile devices. WP Mobile Detector also provides mobile statistics and comes with 7 built-in mobile friendly themes. The premium version lets you create custom themes and display ads for mobile devices.

Jetpack’s Mobile Theme: This plugin suite brings some features of wordpress.com to your self-hosted WordPress site. It comes with a mobile theme which is snappy and fast loading on mobile devices. The mobile theme will use the design elements from your desktop WordPress theme by default but you can customize it with some simple modifications on CSS.

3. Design a separate mobile version of your site

If you create separate mobile version of your website, you will have two separate websites, a desktop site and a mobile site. The mobile site is usually given an alias like m.yoursite.com and it helps people recognize that they are on the mobile version. When someone visits your site on a mobile device, they get redirected to the mobile site automatically. Having a separate site for mobile users can help you provide different content for mobile and desktop users. You can always control what the mobile visitor sees, and the content on desktop version of your site will not affect this. The only drawback is that you have to make the changes on desktop and mobile sites separately and this will consume more time. Designing a separate mobile version of your website used to require technical skills before, but now there are many services that would help you easily create and host one for free.

How to build the mobile version of your site

You can either hire a developer to get this done for you or follow this simple guide to build one with a free service called dudamobile.

1. Head over to http://my.dudamobile.com and sign up for a free account.

2. Once you create your free account you will be redirected to the dashboard. Click on “Create mobile site’ button over there.

3. In the new popup box, select ‘Use an existing website URL’ and enter your website URL, site nickname and choose the category your site belongs to.

4. Click on ‘Convert’ and you will be presented with the editor page where you can customize the looks of your mobile version. There is a preview panel to the right of the editor. Once you are done with customizations, click on ‘Next’.

5. You will be taken to the page editor where you can add different objects like social sharing buttons and other widgets. Once you have added required elements and everything looks fine, click on ‘Next’.

6. In the next page, you will be asked to select a plan for the service; premium plan has features like ad free site, custom subdomain like m.yoursite.com support and many more. We shall go with the free plan in this tutorial. Select free plan and click on “go live’.

7. As a final step, click on ‘Setup my mobile redirection’ and you will be provided with a JavaScript code which you will have to add on your site. Alternatively, you can search for ‘Mobile Website Builder for WordPress by DudaMobile’ in the WordPress Plugins repository and install the plugin. And voila! You have a separate mobile version of your site now.

To get your m.yoursite.com alias, you will have to upgrade to dudamobile premium.

Things to keep in mind

Using a responsive theme is the best option among all these as you will have less work to take care of. It has to be noted that using free plan of services like dudamobile can have a negative impact as the URL of your mobile site begins with their domain. If you have a blog, it is better to go with the responsive theme or wordpress plugin method rather than creating a separate mobile site. Creating a separate site with m.yoursite.com alias is better if you have a static website where new content is not added very frequently.

Please let us know in the comments below… Do you read a lot of websites on your mobile phone?